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NASA & Houston Cinema Arts Society ‘CineSpace’ Short Film Competition for All Filmmakers: Videos Must Have at Least 10 Percent Publically Available NASA Imagery & Be Up to 15 Minutes (Total) Running Time: Submit Your Videos Before 11:59 p.m. EST on July 31, 2015

Wed July 15, 2015

cinespace-contest-logo-crop

The following video presents CineSpace Video Contest Promo from CineSpace on Vimeo.

NASA and Houston Cinema Arts Society offer filmmakers around the world a chance to share their works inspired by, and using, real NASA imagery through “CineSpace,” a new short film competition premiering at Houston Cinema Arts Festival, November 12-19, 2015.

Films featuring real NASA footage collected from over 50 years of its history will be judged on the creativity, innovation, and attention to detail that are the hallmarks of spaceflight.

NASA and Houston Cinema Arts Society will choose Finalist or “Official Selections,” which will screen at the Houston Cinema Arts Festival in November 2015. Other screenings may also take place throughout the year. NASA judges will award prizes from the Finalist pool.

What We Are Looking For: We are considering short video, film, and digital-media submissions of 15 minutes or less and are seeking works of all genres, formats, and styles including but not limited to narrative, documentary, humorous, dramatic, animation, experimental, ambient, music videos, re-mix, sports, horror, and underground.

We are looking for Submissions that

Are based on innovative artistic presentation and storytelling.
Provoke an emotional response.
Show a mastery of filmmaking craftsmanship.
Submissions MUST contain at least 10% (based on total running time) of NASA video imagery. More than 10% can be used and still photos can also be used in addition to the video imagery. This imagery may be obtained through the NASA Image Archives or other publicly available means such as YouTube or other.

Top prize for this competition is $10,000 USD.

Submission period: June 1, 2015 through July 31, 2015.

More information can be found on cinespace15.org, or by emailing cinespace@cinemartsociety.org

Entries will be competing for a total of $26,000 in prizes, with cash awards going to the top three submissions and the two films chosen that best depict the themes of “Benefits to Humanity from the International Space Station” and “Spirit of Future Exploration of Space.”

CineSpace is a new and untested chance to inspire the next generation of explorers. This unique opportunity allows others to help tell the story of humanity’s place in the cosmos as they see it, with the help of NASA’s vast library of moving and still imagery. Exploration and discovery, which are central to NASA’s mission, are as connected to human psyche as is art, so we are excited to see how artists can help to communicate that mission.

Michael Suffredini, International Space Station Program manager

The Screenings and Competition (hereafter “Competition”) is offered and open only to natural persons who are at least 18 years of age at the time of entry.

  • Parents and guardians of film makers younger than 18 can submit on their behalf.
  • THIS COMPETITION IS VOID WHERE PROHIBITED.

All genres will be considered for all prizes.

The Selection Committee and Competition Judges (collectively the “Jury”) understand that various genres and formats have different dominant qualities. The Jury will consider the following to select finalists and winners:

  • Is the work based on innovative artistic presentation and storytelling?
  • Does the work provoke an emotional response?
  • Does the work show a mastery of filmmaking craftsmanship?
  • Does the work exemplify creative excellence that pushes the boundaries of filmmaking and storytelling?
  • Does the work show a high level of technical, conceptual, and aesthetic innovation and display an exceptional level of creative vision.
  • Does the work show an exemplary use of the original NASA material used?
  • Does the work show an exceptional level of creative vision and execution?
  • Does the work capture a creative expression?
  • Does the work explore new ideas or techniques to further filmmaking as an art form?
  • Does the work offer a fresh perspective?

Considerations for Special Criteria
In general, The Jury is looking for Submissions that elevate the featured themes using creative and original cinematic and/or storytelling techniques.

“Film Best Depicting Benefits to Humanity from the International Space Station”
The Jury will use the following NASA statement as a guide:  “Through advancing the state of scientific knowledge of our planet, looking after our health, and providing a space platform that inspires and educates the science and technology leaders of tomorrow, these benefits will drive the legacy of the space station as its research strengthens economies and enhances the quality of life here on Earth for all people. This Special Award is for the submission that best captures and communicates this message.”

“Film Best Depicting Spirit of Future Exploration of Space.”
The Jury will use the following NASA statement as a guide:  “Exploration and pioneering have inspired and shaped civilizations since the dawn of history. Such endeavors are distinguishing characteristics of an advancing civilization. The U.S. and NASA have figured prominently in this story. As nations explore, they discover, innovate, prosper, lead— and become great. NASA missions, both robotic and human, expand the knowledge of our planet, our solar system, and the universe, leading to the expansion of mankind itself from the Earth to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. This Special Award is for the submission that best captures and communicates this message.”

Prizes

Competition Awards

  • Grand Prize: USD 10,000
  • Second Prize: USD 5,000
  • Third Prize: USD 3,000

Special Judging Categories and Awards for

  • Film Best Depicting Benefits to Humanity from the International Space Station: USD 4,000
  • Film Best Depicting Spirit of Future Exploration of Space: USD 4,000

All remaining finalists receive Official Selection mention.
All Finalists will be “CineSpace 2015 Official Selections” and their works will screen at Houston Cinema Arts Festival November 12-19, 2015. The Finalists’ works will also be posted on the HCAS (Houston Cinema Arts Society) website and various NASA websites. Subsequent screenings may take place at special events throughout the remaining year and a compilation of the finalist may be submitted for screening in its entirety to other collaborating film festivals internationally. All Finalists will be notified of website posts and all screenings.

The following video presents Cinespace15 Short Film Contest:

Deadline to Enter: July 31, 2015

http://cinespace15.org/

NASA and the Houston Cinema Arts Society will offer filmmakers around the world a chance to share their works inspired by and using actual NASA imagery through “CineSpace,” a new short film competition premiering at the Houston Cinema Arts Festival, November 12 – 19, 2015.

Films featuring real NASA footage collected from 50 years of exploring the universe will be judged on the same creativity, innovation and attention to detail that are the hallmarks of spaceflight. Works will compete for cash prizes and other recognition and the opportunity to be shown to audiences both on and off the Earth.

Entry


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Articles

NASA’s New Horizons Spacecraft is Snapping Pluto Photos Via the LORRI Telescopic Camera and Ralph’s Color Camera: Closest Approach to Pluto Occurs on July 14, 2015

Sat July 11, 2015

The Pluto Encounter infographic

The Pluto Encounter infographic

The following video presents July 10th Daily Briefing for New Horizons/Pluto Mission Pre-Flyby:

July 10th daily pre-flyby overview of the New Horizons mission, the spacecraft and its suite of instruments and a summary of Pluto science to date from the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Maryland, site of the mission operations center.

Science Payload of New Horizons spacecraft: Image Courtesy of NASA

Science Payload of New Horizons spacecraft: Image Courtesy of NASA

"Shipping a Science Lab to Pluto" infographic

“Shipping a Science Lab to Pluto” infographic

The science payload of NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft includes the following cameras:
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Articles

Mars Rover Curiosity’s Cameras Captured Selfies, Broken Sidewalk, Small Ball, Pyramid, Bird Sculpture & Laser Shots

Mon October 6, 2014

NASA’s Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) spacecraft (launched from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, on Nov. 26, 2011) set down on Mars a large, mobile laboratory — the rover Curiosity — at Gale Crater on the floor of Gale Crater on Aug. 6, 2012 Universal Time (evening of Aug. 5, Pacific Time).

  • The rover studies the geology and environment of selected areas in the crater and analyzes samples drilled from rocks or scooped from the ground.
  • Within the first eight months of a planned 23-month primary mission, Curiosity met its major objective of finding evidence of a past environment well suited to supporting microbial life.
    • Images from the rover showed an area where “water once coursed vigorously over the surface.”
    • The evidence for stream flow was in rounded pebbles (spheres up to a few centimeters) mixed with hardened sand in conglomerate rocks at and near the landing site.
    • This indicates sustained abrasion of rock fragments within water flows that crossed Gale Crater.
  • The touchdown site, Bradbury Landing, is near the foot of a layered mountain, Mount Sharp (Aeolis Mons).
  • Please note: a Martian day for rover Curiosity is one Sol (in the satellite of our sun).

Curiosity’s 17 cameras consist of both engineering and science cameras.

There are four types of engineering cameras.

Like the Mars Exploration Rovers, Curiosity has a stereo Navigation Camera on its mast and low-slung, stereo Hazard-Avoidance cameras. The wide view of the Navigation Camera is also used to aid targeting of other instruments and to survey the sky for clouds and dust.

  • Front Hazard Avoidance Cameras (Front Hazcams)
Front Hazcams. Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech.

Front Hazcams. Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech.

This image was taken by Front Hazcam: Left B (FHAZ_LEFT_B) onboard NASA's Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 762 (2014-09-28 03:17:13 UTC). Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech.

This image was taken by Front Hazcam: Left B (FHAZ_LEFT_B) onboard NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 762 (2014-09-28 03:17:13 UTC). Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech.

  • Rear Hazard Avoidance Cameras (Rear Hazcams)
Rear Hazcams. Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech.

Rear Hazcams. Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech.

This image was taken by Rear Hazcam: Left B (RHAZ_LEFT_B) onboard NASA's Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 758 (2014-09-23 20:53:00 UTC). Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech.

This image was taken by Rear Hazcam: Left B (RHAZ_LEFT_B) onboard NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 758 (2014-09-23 20:53:00 UTC). Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech.

  • Left Navigation Camera (Navcams)
Left Navcams. Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech.

Left Navcams. Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech.

The drive by NASA's Mars rover Curiosity during the mission's 43rd Martian day, or sol, (Sept. 19, 2012) ended with this rock about 8 feet (2.5 meters) in front of the rover. The pyramid-shaped rock is about 10 inches (25 centimeters) tall and 16 inches (40 centimeters) wide. The image was taken by the left Navigation camera (Navcam) at the end of the drive. The rock has been named "Jake Matijevic." Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech.

The drive by NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity during the mission’s 43rd Martian day, or sol, (Sept. 19, 2012) ended with this rock about 8 feet (2.5 meters) in front of the rover. The pyramid-shaped rock is about 10 inches (25 centimeters) tall and 16 inches (40 centimeters) wide. The image was taken by the left Navigation camera (Navcam) at the end of the drive. The rock has been named “Jake Matijevic.” Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech.

  • Right Navigation Cameras (Navcams)
right navcams. Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech.

Right Navcams. Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech.

MSL payload on Curisoity. Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech.

MSL payload on Curisoity. Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech.

There are four types of science cameras.

Mars Descent Imager (MARDI)

MARDI. Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech.

MARDI. Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech.


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25th Anniversary of Voyager 2 Flyby of Triton Commemorated With Movie

Wed August 27, 2014

Triton, Neptune’s largest moon, received a visit from Voyager 2 back on August 25, 1989. Voyager 2 passed within 40,000 kilometers of Triton and took lots of images. Now, for the first time, and to commemorate the 25th anniversary of this dramatic encounter, the images have been gathered into a movie. The resolution is 600 meters per pixel and is in orange, green and blue (showing Triton in approximately natural colors).

It’s a really fast flyby and the video starts with Voyager 2 about 3 days out from Triton, travelling at a speed of approx. 25 kilometers per second, passing over the unlit north pole, pivoting to see the departing moon (now visible as a diminishing crescent) and then ending about a week on the outbound trajectory. Triton is 2706 kilometers across.

The new Triton map has a resolution of 1,970 feet (600 meters) per pixel. The colors have been enhanced to bring out contrast but are a close approximation to Triton’s natural colors. Voyager’s “eyes” saw in colors slightly different from human eyes, and this map was produced using orange, green and blue filter images.

Image Credit: Voyager 2, JPL, NASA; Digital composition: Paul Schenk (LPI, USRA)

via nasa

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Deals

Sponsored Video: Big Data Cloud Computing Helps NASA Rover Curiosity Land on Mars

Tue July 8, 2014

Discover More at www.powerof60.com

Launching a rover to Mars requires astronomical computing power. NASA JPL relies on Big Data Cloud Computing from Amazon Web Services built on the Intel® Xeon® processor E5 family.

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Articles

Watch Live NASA’s LDSD ‘Flying Saucer’ Test June 2014 Via Onboard Cameras

Tue June 3, 2014

This video presents “LDSD: We Brake for Mars (Part 1).”

  • NASA and JPL are testing a supersonic parachute under Mars-like conditions for future exploration.

Rocket-powered Test Vehicle of the Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator Project (LDSD). This artist's concept shows the test vehicle for NASA's LDSD, designed to test landing technologies for future Mars missions. A balloon will lift the vehicle to high altitudes, where a rocket will take it even higher, to the top of the stratosphere, at several times the speed of sound. The Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator Project is managed by JPL for NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate in Washington. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Rocket-powered Test Vehicle of the Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator Project (LDSD). This artist’s concept shows the test vehicle for NASA’s LDSD, designed to test landing technologies for future Mars missions. A balloon will lift the vehicle to high altitudes, where a rocket will take it even higher, to the top of the stratosphere, at several times the speed of sound. The Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator Project is managed by JPL for NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate in Washington. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

NASA’s Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) project is a rocket-powered, flying saucer-shaped test vehicle for NASA’s Evolvable Mars campaign.

NASA’s LDSD project’s goals, led by JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), are as follows.

The two supersonic decelerator technologies to be tested are:


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Apps, Articles

Celebrate Earth Day 2014: NASA’s #GlobalSelfie Event + Celebratory Events in Canada

Tue April 22, 2014

This video presents “Earth Day 2014 Promo.”

  • Enjoy the beautiful scenery on Earth as NASA takes part in a worldwide celebration of Earth Day.
  • Today, April 22, is #EarthDay. Are you ready for your #GlobalSelfie?
  • Join NASA and the world celebrate environmental awareness with the agency’s #GlobalSelfie event.

NASA: #Global Selfie Sign for Earth Day 2014

NASA: #GlobalSelfie Sign for Earth Day 2014

NASA invites you — and everyone else on the planet — to take part in a worldwide celebration of Earth Day this year with the agency’s #GlobalSelfie event.

Earth Right Now Campaign

  • The year 2014 is a big one for NASA Earth science.
  • Five NASA missions designed to gather critical data about our home planet are launching this year to expand our understanding of Earth’s changing climate and environment.
  • NASA is marking this big year for Earth science with a campaign called Earth Right Now, and as part of this campaign the agency is asking for your help this Earth Day, April 22.

“NASA astronauts brought home the first ever images of the whole planet from space. Now NASA satellites capture new images of Earth every second. For Earth Day we are trying to create an image of Earth from the ground up while also fostering a collection of portraits of the people of Earth. Once those pictures stream around the world on Earth Day, the individual pictures tagged #GlobalSelfie will be used to create a mosaic image of Earth — a new “Blue Marble” built bit by bit with your photos.”

  • On Earth Day, NASA is asking you to step outside and take a picture of yourself wherever you are on Earth. Then post it to social media using the hashtag #GlobalSelfie.
NASA's "Earth Now" App

NASA’s “Earth Now” App

  • NASA’s FREE “Earth Now” Apple and Android app “immerses users in dazzling visualizations of near-real-time global climate data from NASA’s fleet of Earth science satellites.”

Today, April 22, is Earth Day. “What are you doing to show your love for the planet?”

A Nature Conservancy of Canada's Earth Day tribute e-card.

A Nature Conservancy of Canada’s Earth Day tribute e-card.

Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) has the following three great ways you can take time for nature and spread some nature love:


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Featured Site

NASA on Flickr – Real ‘Gravity’ Space Photos

Sat March 15, 2014

The Gravity movie has generated lots of interest on space missions. However, as Hollywood would have it, it is over-dramatized and no astronauts could survive accidents of the sort depicted in the movie.

Not to be outdone by — and taking advantage of — the interest and popularity of the movie, NASA has posted “Real-Life Images from Space” on Flickr for our enjoyment.

Visit our Featured Site: ‘Gravity’ – NASA’s Real-Life Images from Space.

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Sponsored Video: NASA JPL and AWS with Intel

Fri December 13, 2013

NASA JPL compresses a day into an hour using AWS with Intel.

The Power of 60

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Articles, Videos

NASA Asks What are the “Mysterious Green Patches on the Sky”: Airglow Phenomenon Photography?

Tue October 1, 2013

This video presents “Hopewell Rocks perseid meteor shower time lapse.”

  • Kevin Snair filmed perseid meteor shower time lapse at enchanting Hopewell Rocks in New Brunswick, Canada from before twilight August 11 to shortly after 3:00 am August 12.
  • The green ‘clouds’  are visible in this silent video at 25 sec. to 28 sec. interval.

NASA astronomers are asking viewers what are the “Mysterious Green Patches on the Sky,” as they ponder the significance of these green images.

Snair explained that the green ‘clouds’ result from airglow phenomenon which is very weak emission of light by Earth’s atmosphere so that the night sky is never completely dark.

Another airglow phenomenon was captured on 15 September 2011 in the following photograph featuring

Photo: International Space Station Imagery (ISS028-E-050185; 15 Sept. 2011).

Photo: International Space Station Imagery (ISS028-E-050185; 15 Sept. 2011).

NASA also included the following possible explanations for the mysterious green patches:


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Sponsored Post

Sponsored Video: NASA JPL and AWS with Intel

Tue July 16, 2013

NASA JPL compresses a day into an hour using AWS with Intel.

NASA JPL engineers speed up Curiosity mission data analysis to leave more time for science and discovery by putting Amazon Web Services with Intel to work.

Read more about The Power of 60.

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Videos

Earth From Orbit

Sat April 27, 2013

NASA looks “back at the best views of our planet Earth from space in the last year, including true color satellite images, Earth science data visualizations, time lapses from the International Space Station, and computer models.


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