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Fun Stuff, Videos

I Got Laid Off and…

Mon November 30, 2009

[ via Chris Brogan ]


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Articles, Videos

Swimmer’s Shoot

Mon November 30, 2009

DSLR + External Flash = Fantastic pictures!

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Fun Stuff

What Did You Get for Black Friday?

Mon November 30, 2009

Did you get in line and buy that digital camera you wanted on Black Friday? Or, are you still in line on Cyber Monday? ;)

Macro Lightbox

Macro Lightbox

Moi, I finally got a carton box, tracing paper, and built myself the $10 macro lightbox for product shots. :D

A few pointers if you decide to build one too:

  • Box should be at least 12″ x 12″ x 12″. If it’s smaller, don’t bother because it’s just too small to accomodate the item to be photographed and the seamless background. You’ll just end up redoing it. [Speaking from experience here :( .]
  • Mine is 24″W X 13″H x 15″D and, as you can see from the picture above, the width is perfectly sized to accept a sheet of 28″L x 22″W posterboard I got from Staples (for about $1 CAD).
  • Use a xacto knife with a sure handle. The last thing you want is for the knife to slip and cut fingers. [No, all my fingers are still intact.]
  • Use a metal ruler. I have one with a cork back so it does not slip (too much). If you use a wood ruler, the sharp knife may just slice through it (and limbs).
  • You don’t have to measure. On the small sides, I just place the ruler against each edge in turn and draw a line with a dark pencil first as a visual guide and to know where the lines intersect (so where to stop cutting). For the top, I use the sheet of tracing paper (14″ x 17″) as a guide and mark the edges to ensure I am not cutting the window too large for the tracing paper.
  • When you make the actual cut, make a number of light straight cuts instead of one deep cut. This lessens the risk of the knife suddenly slipping and cutting fingers.
  • Just be careful how you position yourself vis-a-vis the knife. Again you don’t want the knife to slip and stab you.
  • The box tends to cave in when you are cutting at the open edge. This makes it easy for the knife to slip or for you to place your fingers too close to the edge and in the knife’s path. Close the lids (you know, one inside the other) so you have sturdier edges to cut through.
  • Cut the lids last (so you can do the above). In fact, I left all four lids intact for now.
(Green) Cell Phone

(Green) Cell Phone

And here’s the first product shot of my (Green, as in made from recycled parts) Cell Phone I took just using the daylight streaming through a window on the right. [I still have to get the lamps for even lighting from both sides.] Not too shabby for a quick first shot, eh?

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Fun Stuff

Promos That Do Not Work

Mon November 30, 2009

This promo encourages you to vote for your favorite movie and then rewards you with a free ticket to see it again!

If you have already seen it [how else can you honestly vote it as your favorite movie?], then the incentive to see it again is low — and therefore the incentive to participate in the contest is low. OK, unless it is one of the TWILIGHT saga which, if I understand correctly, some [female of the species] have viewed MANY times, and would not mind viewing one more time.

Or, unless you vote for the movie that you have not seen yet but would like to so that if you do win the free ticket, then it’s a free ticket…

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Fun Stuff

Un-Google Yourself

Mon November 30, 2009

The Spanish explorer Juan Ponce de León, first Governor of Puerto Rico, traveled to what is now Florida in 1513 searching for the Fountain of Youth [Wikipedia]. Little did he realize that said fountain has now been discovered and it is called… “Google.” ;)

As many of you know — and unfortunately many still do not — once you publish something on the Internet, it stays there forever. Yes, read this again: FOR EVER!

Even if you delete the contents of your blog, remove the pictures from your gallery, unsubscribe from newsletters, and delete your accounts from Facebook, mypace and other social media venues — you’re still floating around in cyberspace, hidden on backup servers, cached content, and the hard drives of millions of home computers that have viewed (and therefore downloaded) your pages, pictures and words. Yes, in a sense, you are immortalised. Not necessarily young, but certainly as you appear in your picture the day you (or a friend) published it on the Internet.

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Articles

Take Product Photos, Easy!

Mon November 30, 2009

Flint Hannah has shared a tutorial on how to take the perfectly lit product photo, the simple way. And I have to say that it is in one of the easiest-to-understand tutorial we’ve read in a long time. It is described step by step and well illustrated so there can be no confusion.

It is a breath of fresh air to read a “real” tutorial as opposed to the drivel many publishes, illustrated with stock photos that they have not taken themselves.

[ Read the tutorial at: photo tuts plus ]

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Weird Stuff

No Photos (Please)

Mon November 30, 2009

Increasingly, the act of pointing a digital SLR camera at anything is becoming not just undesired but illegal in many countries. Very often the “Please” is left out and the photographer is treated as a criminal.

Michael Coyne shares his experiences photographing in Hong Kong. It exposes the stupidity of the “No Photography” law wherever it is enforced and of the simple minds who enact such laws.

[ Read the article at: Black Star Rising ]

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Reviews on the Web

Pentax K-7 Review @ Photocrati

Mon November 30, 2009
Pentax K-7

Pentax K-7

Peter Burian tests this rugged, well-sealed 14.5MP camera with pro caliber versatility and extras such as Movie mode and in-camera HDR

The flagship of the Pentax DLSR series, the K-7 is an unusually rugged semi-professional 14.5 MP camera that’s built like a tank: with a splash-proof magnesium alloy body over a stainless steel chassis. While the 14.5 megapixel K20D is less pricey, the K-7 is even more desirable. This newer model retains all of the K20D’s best features but provides significant benefits: faster (5.2 fps) drive speed, larger 3″ LCD with 920,000 dot resolution, a viewfinder with 100% coverage, plus upgrades for the sensor, processor, autofocus system, built-in image stabilizer and evaluative metering (now with 77 zones). More importantly, the K-7 offers some entirely new functions, including HD Movie mode.

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Reviews on the Web

Leica S2 Field and Studio Review @ Luminous Landscape

Mon November 30, 2009
Leica S2

Leica S2

The Leica S2 … may well be one of the finest camera systems ever made.

Luminous Landscape has published their Field and Studio Review of the Leica S2 [QuickPrice Check].

[ Read the Leica S2 Field and Studio Review at: Luminous Landscape ]

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