Amazon.com Widgets
Editorial
Editorial

D-Day 65 Years Ago

Sat June 6, 2009

D-Day

D-Day

Photography played a big part in recording the D-Day invasion of Normandy on June 6, 1944 when Allied troops crossed the English Channel in ships (with aerial protection) and attacked the beaches of Normandy to start the liberation of Europe. Five Normandy beaches were stormed by British, Canadian and American troops. The beaches were codenamed Sword (British troops), Juno (Canadian troops), Gold (British troops), Omaha (US troops) and Utah (US troops). It took three months to capture Normandy and approximately 215,000 Allied soldiers, and roughly as many Germans, were killed or wounded during the battles that ensued.

The Normandy Landings were also known under the code names Operation Neptune and Operation Overlord. It started with an air assault landing of American, British and Canadian airborne troops shortly after midnight, followed by an amphibious landing at 6:30am on the beaches of Normandy.

 

- Wikipedia

Search for more news:


Editorial

Just Bing it!

Fri May 29, 2009

Microsoft bing Decision Engine

Microsoft bing Decision Engine

When you are searching for something, your friends and work colleagues will often say, “Just Google it!” Now that Microsoft is planning to replace its Live Search engine with [wait for it]… “bing” [yes, with a lower case “b”],  I just can’t for the life of me imagine “Just Bing it!” taking off.

“bing” is being promoted as not just a search engine. No, it is a “decision engine.” On a more serious note, the demo video does look very interesting. Instead of just returning the links, it also gives you right underneath sublinks to where you might really want to go, related links, etc. — though I have not seen anything different than what Google returns in its searches. The lofty goal of bing is to help you make a decision right there while you are searching for something.

I just don’t get the name, though. Is “Bing!” supposed to be the sound that echoes back when your search hits the right results in Internet space?

Search for more news:


Editorial, Reviews on the Web

Canon EOS T1i / 500D Review @ Steve’s Digicams

Tue May 26, 2009

Canon EOS Rebel T1i / 500D

Canon EOS Rebel T1i / 500D

Steve’s Digicams has published their review of the Canon EOS Rebel T1i / 500D [Specs], a DSLR whichoffers "class leading ISO capabilities" and featuring 15.1MP resolution (on a 22.3 x 14.9 mm CMOS sensor), an extra large 3.0-in. high resolution (920K dots) LCD, Integrated Cleaning System, 9-point Phase Detection AF, Live View, PASM, Shutter Speed range of 30 – 1/4000 sec. plus Bulb, Continuous 3.4fps, and RAW file format.

Don't see the right camera advertised? Click thru to PriceGrabber and search for it there -or- enter the name in the search bar below and click FIND IT. Thank you for your support!

Search for more reviews:


Editorial

Is The Megapixels Race (Really, Finally) Over?

Wed April 15, 2009

Every new digicam seems to sport a 12 megapixel resolution image sensor these days. More megapixels generally mean more pixels to capture an image — and hence theoretically more detail that can be captured by the sensor.

But is that true in practice? Do you see better image quality as megapixels increase?


Continue Reading »

Search for more articles:


Editorial

Transitioning to New Photoxels Design

Sat April 11, 2009

We will be slowly transitioning to our new design starting today. This means that the home page for http://www.photoxels.com will now become http://www.photoxels.com/photography.

Both sites will be up and running in parallel and we will not rush the transition. This gives our readers time to get used to the new design, send us their valuable feedback — and help us keep our sanity ;o).

The new design has a cleaner interface and each article is tagged with appropriate keywords, which makes it real easy to search for related items.

All the great features you’ve come to love will still be available, and we plan to add more.

One new feature we are really excited to offer our readers is a number of flexible ways to contribute their views to the site:

  1. Comment. All you need to comment to a news item is to enter a valid email.
  2. Register. Registered users can also contribute articles, reviews and news items. These are subject to review and, if approved, will get published under your own byline.
  3. Google Friend Connect. Join Google Friend Connect and invite your friends, too! Comment, review, and rate articles.

Editorial

Are any of you still using film?

Sat February 14, 2009

I read a series of posts recently on a forum where a couple of photographers admitted that they still used film (and digital, too) and preferred film for the total experience it gave them.

One photographer then went on to say that the real pros would never switch to digital because there was something special about using film that you don’t get with using digital.

That is very true! However, it also reminded me of the time when word processors started becoming popular — and reading interviews after interviews where successful writers vowed they would never switch because there was something magical about hitting the typewriter keys, advancing to a new line, even changing paper that helped them think and weave words — an experience that they did not get from using a computer and a cheap word processor program.

However, today we don’t hear of any successful writers still using the typewriter — or complaining that they are a worse writer because of the word processor. The word processor has replaced the typewriter. Whether some of us like it or not, digital will eventually replace film.

It’s never easy to shift to a new medium (digital) once we have mastered the old one (film). Especially if we try very hard and find that we cannot be as good using the new as we are using the old.  Or, we might simply prefer the old over the new.

Thankfully, good artistry is always recognized and valued whether it comes from film or digital, and there will probably always be a market (often, a very lucrative one) for excellent film photographs.

Many years from now, a new medium will exist to record images — and digital photographers would then be the ones vowing they will never change!

Search for more articles:


Editorial

Happy New Year 2009!

Thu January 1, 2009

Happy New Year 2009!

Happy New Year 2009!

We hope the past year has been good for you and offer our best wishes for a happy and prosperous New Year 2009!

This should be an exciting year. We hope this is the year we see the larger APS-sized image sensors being introduced into the compact non-DSLR digital cameras, which should in one swoop eliminate the image quality disparity between the compact digicams and the DSLRs. Being able to take low noise high ISO pictures remain the number one desire of point-and-shoot photographers.


Continue Reading »


« Newer Entries