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Contests

Ontario Conservation Areas Photo Contest 2011

Mon August 22, 2011

In continuing our education about photo rights grab, here’s another example of a photo contest that amounts to a rights grab.

The Ontario Conservation Areas Photo Contest 2011 has a laudable objective in raising awareness about conservation and its photo contest is a step in the right direction. However, for the prize of a Canon EOS Digital Rebel XS, you will lose all rights to your prize-winning photos. In fact, all submitted photos, whether they win a prize or not, automatically become the exclusive property of Conservation Ontario to use as they will for whatever purpose they want.

Repeat: By entering this contest, you automatically lose all rights to your submitted pictures (whether they win a prize or not) which, in effect, amounts to a rights grab.

Here are the relevant portions of the rules about copyrights:

6. To be considered in the contest, all submissions must be original, unpublished photographs taken of or in an Ontario Conservation Area and submitted by the amateur photographer who took the photo. By entering into the contest, the contestant grants Conservation Ontario and its partner Conservation Authorities the unrestricted and exclusive rights to use the photograph(s) for any purpose. This includes, but is not limited to, publishing your photograph(s) in print or electronic form for promotional purposes without further compensation or notification. The photographer must own all rights to any photographs entered in this contest. It is the responsibility of the contestant to ensure that publication of the photographs raises no legal claims. Accordingly, by entering the contest, you agree to compensate Conservation Ontario fully regarding any claims arising out of the use of your photograph(s). Photograph(s) previously published in full or in part in other publications, contests etc, are not eligible.

We realize that Conservation Ontario probably does not mean to engage in a photo rights grab but that is what their rules amount to currently. We recommend that the rules be changed to read: “[...] By entering into the contest, the contestant grants Conservation Ontario and its partner Conservation Authorities the restricted and non-exclusive rights to use the photograph(s) for the strict purpose of promoting this contest for a period of one year. The contestant retains all rights to submitted photos. [...]”

Read the rules at: ontarioconservationareas

You can obtain more information about your photo rights and rights grab photo contests at: Photo Attorney.

Related Links:

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Articles

Ferreting Out Fake Reviews

Mon August 22, 2011

Not all reviews are created equal. That’s obvious. Some are uber detailed, others less so. All have a bias, notwithstanding what the reviewers profess. No one is 100% objective — and besides, what do we care about a 100% objective review? What we do care about is the reviewer’s personal opinions based on his or her expertise, experience and personal bias that we subscribe to.

Two top perfectly independent reviewers may come to different conclusions about the same product, based on personal bias — and bias is not being used here in a pejorative way. We all have a personal bias: some like a big camera that will comfortably fit their big hands; others prefer compact, lightweight, even pocketable cameras. Some like futuristic looking designs, others pine for retro looks. Some swear about sharpness, others prefer low light capability. Some put a high stock in features such as Art Filters, HDR capability, in-camera panorama — others couldn’t give a hoot. And, some always consider the price of the camera in coming up with their final rating while others never do. The key is to find reviewers that subscribe more or less to your personal bias and give more weight to their reviews than to those reviews that have a different personal bias from yours.

Does this make sense? After all, you are not trying to find the best digital camera — only the digital camera that is best for you. That is why you need to get to know the personal bias of the reviewers. Even reviewers from the same review site will have a different bias and can come up with different final verdicts, depending on who gets to do the review.

But what about totally fake reviews? Reviews that are really paid for and that [usually] gush positively about a product? [Though your competitors will also pay people to post negative reviews about your product.] How can you tell the real review from the fake? Well, apparently Cornell University researchers Myle Ott, Yejin Choi, Claire Cardie and Jeffrey T. Hancock are coming out with a “Fake Review Detector.” Right now, it’s only spelled out in a thesis paper titled, “Finding Deceptive Opinion Spam by Any Stretch of the Imagination” that you can download.

Read the article at In a Race to Out-Rave, 5-Star Web Reviews Go for $5 @ NYTimes.

via gizmodo

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Fun Stuff

Cuddle In Bed With Your Favorite Lens

Mon August 22, 2011

If you could get in bed with your favorite lens, would you? You might think that a better question would be, can I? Well, yes, you can with Plustography, which makes pillows that look like lenses. Who makes pillows that look like lenses, anyway? According to their web sites, these pillows are 100% handmade by camera heads Benson, Christine and Kevin. Currently they only make a few models, according to the voices they hear in their camera heads (and also on polls). Most are already temporarily sold out, which means there are many of you out there who do sleep with your lenses — or else, it’s a clever marketing ploy (mark everything as “temporarily sold out”). But fear not, they promise they just can’t F-stop making them, though, set to Full Manual mode, it may take some time. So, patience.

I hope they make camera pillows next. Now, that will require them to use a fast shutter-speed and maybe even switch to iAUTO to be able to meet the demand.

Visit Plustography.

via gizmodo

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Fun Stuff, How Did They Do That

Cinemagraphs Galore

Mon August 22, 2011

Photographers are rediscovering animated GIFS as an art medium but these are not your dorky looping GIFS that make you want to close your browser window right away. Instead, the animation is carefully selected and applied to only one portion of an image to add a delightful twist to an otherwise very still image. If the animation takes some time to kick in, it can even surprise. There is even have a new name for these animated GIFS: cinemagraphs.

Check out the following cinemagraphs:

You can use different image editing software to create animated GIFs. For those using Windows, MIcrosoft used to make a free one called, appropriately, Microsoft GIF Animator. You can do a search and download it. You can also use Photoshop, After Effects, etc.

Basically, take a series of pictures. Ideally, nothing is moving, except what you want, e.g. smoke from a hot cup of tea, a cat’s tail, etc. If other parts of the picture is also moving, you’ll have a harder time editing these out. Then in Photoshop, simply layer the pictures and Save for Web as a GIF. Click the Animate and Loop checkbox et voilà! We’ll work on a tutorial later.

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Reviews on the Web

Nikon D5100 vs. Olympus E-P3 @ Mashable

Mon August 22, 2011

Mashable compares a Nikon D5100 traditional DSLR with the Olympus E-P3 compact mirrorless DSLR with the object of finding a camera “that can deliver higher quality photographs than a cellphone camera or point-and-shoot, but will still satisfy those who will be shooting in automatic mode most the time.” In other words, as a blogger tired of your phone camera or point-and-shoot camera pictures, should you upgrade to a traditional DSLR or will a compact mirrorless DSLR suffice?

Read Nikon D5100 vs. Olympus E-P3 @ Mashable.

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Don't see the right camera advertised? Click thru to PriceGrabber and search for it there -or- enter the name in the search bar below and click FIND IT. Thank you for your support!

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Articles

Fixing A Leica M4-P

Mon August 22, 2011

Fixing an old battered Leica M4 is not a job for the faint-hearted. Paal Audestad found the used Leica M4-P at a thrift store in Oslo in 1987, and the camera cost 2200 kroner (US $400???). He used it until 2000. Leica found out about his “love affair” with the M4-P and decided to see if they could fix it.

Besides general cleaning and lubrication, here are some of the other fixes that were required:

Replacing the Rewind button
Replacing and adjusting the distance measures
Adjusting the winding mechanism
Clean, lubricate and adjust the shutter
Adjusting the shutter lock
Adjusting Rewind
Adjusts the focus mechanism
Clean-looking
Change search window
General mechanical adjustment of all parts

Read the article at : Leica [Google translation]

via Leica Rumors

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Articles

The Leica S2 as a Travel Camera @ Luminous Landscape

Mon August 22, 2011

Leica S2

Leica S2

Nick Rains over at Luminous Landscape shares some of his experiences on using the Leica S2 as a travel camera in Western China.

Read The Leica S2 as a Travel Camera @ Luminous Landscape.

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Videos

Focus Tutorial from the Canon Learning Center

Mon August 22, 2011

the SM focus tutorial // deconstructing the story from stillmotion on Vimeo.

This tutorial takes a look at some some basic ideas for holding focus, some tips and tricks for shooting in the field, and devices you can use to assist with focus.

via fstoppers

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Reviews on the Web

Casio EX-ZR100 Review @ DigitalCameraInfo

Sun August 21, 2011

Casio EX-ZR100

Casio EX-ZR100

The Casio ZR100 [offers] speed freaks a camera they can be confident they’ll get results from.

We’ve added another Casio Exilim EX-ZR100 [QuickPrice Check] Review to our Reviews Matrix.

DigitalCameraInfo has published their review of the Casio Exilim EX-ZR100 , a compact ultra zoom digital camera with 12.1MP resolution (on a 1/2.3-inch high-speed CMOS), 12.5x ultra wide-angle optical zoom (24-300mm equiv.), 3.0-in. LCD (460k-dot), Sensor-shift image stabilization, Premium AUTO, PASM shooting modes, high speed videos (up to 1000fps at 224×64 pixels) for ultra-slow motion effect, HDR Art, High-Dynamic Range, Slide 360° Panorama, and HD 1080p Movie 1920 x 1080 @ 30 fps with stereo sound.

You can read the Casio EX-ZR100 Review @ DigitalCameraInfo.

Continue Reading »

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Don't see the right camera advertised? Click thru to PriceGrabber and search for it there -or- enter the name in the search bar below and click FIND IT. Thank you for your support!

CASIO EX-ZR100 REVIEWS
Get a second opinion. Read the best Expert Reviews on the Web.
Date Camera Review Site
>> Reviews Matrix (All the best reviews on one convenient page.)
2011-10-12 Casio EX-ZR100 PhotographyBLOG
2011-08-21 Casio EX-ZR100 DigitalCameraInfo
2011-06-10 Casio EX-ZR100 ePHOTOzine

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